Planet

Walking: The Secret Ingredient for Health, Wealth, and More Exciting Neighborhoods
by Jay Walljasper
It's been called "America's untrendiest trend." The evidence that millions of people are finally walking again is as solid as the ground beneath our feet.
What the Classics Can Teach Us About Cherishing Holiday Foods, From A Christmas Carol to Moby Dick
by Nina Bunker Ruiz
Can we find our way back to treasuring what comes from far away while reveling in local, abun­dant foods, whose proximity makes them affordable and sustainable?
Neighbors Helped This Immigrant-Owned Dry Cleaner in Boston Go Nontoxic—and Stay in Business
by Chuck Collins, Polly Hoppin
Organizations that aim to reduce the use of toxic chemicals have long focused on shutting down offending businesses. But this story from Boston shows another way.
Northern California's Railroads Are Carrying More Crude Oil Than Ever—But These Neighbors Aren't Having It
by Tara Lohan
Residents who have joined the fight against transporting oil by train have also come to understand aspects of the wider context.
UN Climate Negotiators Drop the Ball in Lima—Now It’s Up to the Grassroots to Pick It Up
by Jim Shultz
Negotiators have stopped trying to win a binding international agreement on carbon emissions. Now it’s up to the people to push our governments to action.
These 3 Colleges Stopped Investing in Fossil Fuels—One Year Later, Their Endowments Are Doing Just Fine
by A.C. Shilton
Colleges argue that divestment is not financially responsible—but those who’ve already done it say the risk is minimal.
The New Economy Comes of Age: 7 Steps Toward Shared Prosperity
by Fran Korten
Democratic ownership, localized food production, and a shift to renewables are key principles in this growing movement to re-envision our economy.
An Insurance Policy for Climate Change? How Seed Banks Are Protecting the Future of Food
by Richard Schiffman
“While not every traditional variety tastes great or looks great, its genetics may be invaluable 50 or 100 years from now when the climate is different.”
Meet the Lobstermen Arrested for Blocking a Coal Freighter—and the DA Who Kept Them Out of Jail
by Natasha Donovan
Last spring, these men were in a small white lobster boat anchored to block the path of an oncoming freighter hauling 40,000 tons of coal. They didn't expect the district attorney to support them.
Photo Essay: At a Half-Mile-Long Table, Chefs, Farmers, and Volunteers Feed a Neighborhood for Free
by Valerie Schloredt
In St. Paul, Minnesota, artist Seitu Jones wanted to start a community-wide conversation about food access and food justice—and where better to talk than over a good meal?
When the City Turned Off Their Water, Detroit Residents and Groups Delivered Help
by Larry Gabriel
Grassroots action has backed down the city’s aggressive water shutoffs.
New Film Shows How Florida Farmworkers Won Fairer Pay From America's Biggest Food Companies
by Nur Lalji
"This is not a film about oppression," said Food Chains executive producer Eva Longoria. "It's actually about transformation."
Video: Vancouver Opera Violinist Plays 19th-Century Ballad for Protesters in Pipeline Fight
by Mary Hansen
The cities of Vancouver and Burnaby, as well as First Nations, have all sued the pipeline company Kinder Morgan, which wants to extend a pipeline through a mountain in British Columbia.
Dutch Company Powers Streetlights With Living Plants; Will Your Cell Phone Be Next?
by Kayla Schultz
Forget potato clocks. This promising new technology derives substantial amounts of electricity from living plants.
This Food Stand Celebrates Palestinian Culture. When It Received a Death Threat, Students Stood Up
by Mary Hansen
Conflict Kitchen serves up food from countries in conflict with the United States—and its customers think it's worth defending.