Planet

Without Scalia, a New Chance for Climate Justice
by Patrick Parenteau
Justice Scalia was a thorn in the side of the environmental movement. Now that his seat is up for grabs, the Supreme Court could be in position to make serious gains for the climate.
How to Make Friends in the City: Grow Vegetables Together
by Jasleena Grewal
We asked this East Londoner how a pop-up garden brought his neighborhood together and made friends out of strangers.
The Hidden, Very Good Reason for the $10 Oil Tax
by Arun Gupta
Doomed as it may be, an oil tax is a step toward redefining energy as a public good—for which everyone pays the cost of overuse and abuse.
Why We Need to Keep 80 Percent of Fossil Fuels in the Ground
by Bill McKibben
Life depends on it. Bill McKibben on the big changes we’ve already made in remarkably short order.
Why Massive Snowstorms and Stranded Cars Make Us So Happy
by Colin Beavan
With cars stuck under mounds of snow, city streets become safe public spaces for people. So why wait for a blizzard?
How Far Can We Get Without Flying?
by Peter Kalmus
When a climate scientist decided to stop flying to cut his carbon emissions, he caught a glimpse of the post-oil future.
Rebuilding Trust After Flint: What About the Water In Your City?
by Daniel Moss
Despite decaying infrastructure and budget pressures, city water utilities have mostly delivered on their promise of healthy water.
Brooklyn Youth Create Jobs (and Community Roots) Through Local Compost Program
by Rebecca Nathanson
This neighborhood made gardens out of vacant lots to tackle gentrification and high youth unemployment.
The Pipeline Strikes Back: The Audacity of TransCanada's $15B Suit Against the U.S.
by Jim Shultz
The political saga of the Keystone XL pipeline is like a real-life version of The Force Awakens. So why are we giving the Dark Side even more power?
The Oil Industry Won in Alberta. Now First Nations Look to Heal Their Land
by Erika Lundahl
The Alberta tar sands are home to the third-largest proven reserves of crude oil in the world. Here, First Nations engage in a complex dance of resistance to and cooperation with industry in order to survive.
If There Are No New Farmers, Who Will Grow Our Food?
by Kim Eckart
Programs across the country are trying to make it easier for new farmers to get started and put down roots. Here's why: There's only one farmer under 35 for every six over 65. By 2030, one-quarter of America's current farmers will retire.
As Rising Seas Force Exile, Islanders Hold Fast to What Matters Most
by Keith Barbalato
Pacific Islanders are among the first victims of climate change-induced sea level rise. As natives quickly run out of land and struggle to maintain crops, leaders are searching for ways to protect their people and thousands of years of cultural heritage.
One Clan’s Unique Weapon Against Big Oil
by Stephen Miller
Because the Unist’ot’en clan has given up no land rights after decades of courtroom battles, they maintain a strong foothold on land crucial to future oil expansion plans.
The Deal That Brought the Colorado River Back to the Sea
by Diondra Powers
A new amendment to the 1944 water treaty between Mexico and the United States aims to create a fair, cooperative system for restoring the Colorado River.
How to Stop an Oil Train: The Hearts-and-Minds Climate Defense That Won Over a Courtroom

by Valerie Schloredt
The Delta 5 loss was actually a big win. “Frankly, the court is convinced that the defendants are far from the problem and are part of the solution to the problem of climate change.”