Give Gifts Top Banner

Sections
Home » Planet » San Francisco Bans Sale of Plastic Water Bottles on Public Property

Get a FREE Issue. Yes! I want to try YES! Magazine

Nonprofit. Independent. Subscriber-supported. DONATE. How you can support our work.

YES! by Email
Join over 78,000 others already signed up for FREE YES! news.
[SAMPLE]
link

The YES! ChicoBag(R). Full-size tote that fits in your pocket!

 

San Francisco Bans Sale of Plastic Water Bottles on Public Property

The ban is set to go into effect in October 2014, and will be the first of its kind in the nation.
Document Actions

It took nearly a decade of grassroots organizing to ban the sale of plastic water bottles on public property in San Francisco, according to Nick Guroff of the nonprofit Corporate Accountability International. Finally, in early March 2014, the city's Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to pass a bottle-banning ordinance introduced a year earlier; Mayor Edwin M. Lee signed it into law shortly thereafter.

The city is encouraging residents to use metal or other reusable bottles.

As Eve Andrews wrote in an article at Grist.org, "San Francisco might have done it just a little bit to make every other American city look even worse. (Oh, come on! You were thinking it too!)"

Still, we're cheering for this ecological victory in "Frisco."

Set to take effect in October 2014, it's the first law of its kind to be adopted by a major U.S. city.

"Where we have public spaces, either in buildings, or in parks and other open spacethese are places that we don't want the sale or distribution of plastic water bottles," said David Chiu, the city official who introduced the ordinance last year.

Instead, the city is encouraging residents to use metal or other reusable bottles, Chiu said. As with bans on plastic grocery bags in many cities, the goal is to promote sustainability by cutting down on needless and ecologically harmful waste.

In the video above, created by Center for a New American Dream, San Franciscans talk about how they got the new law passed and how it will be implemented.


Molly Rusk wrote this article for YES! Magazine, a national, nonprofit media organization that fuses powerful ideas with practical actions. Molly is a recent graduate of the program in Creative Writing at the University of Washington and an online reporting intern at YES! Follow her on Twitter @mollylynnrusk.

Read More

Email Signup
Comment on this article

How to add a commentCommenting Policy

comments powered by Disqus


You won’t see any commercial ads in YES!, in print or on this website.
That means, we rely on support from our readers.

||   SUBSCRIBE    ||   GIVE A GIFT   ||   DONATE   ||
Independent. Nonprofit. Subscriber-supported.




Issue Footer

Personal tools