Special Report: The First Nations Blockade That Could Shut Down the Tar Sands

Journey with us to the Unis'to'ten camp, where one First Nations clan stands in the path of three pipelines.
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Barbed wire along the Wedzin Kwah prevents boats from entering the Unist’ot’en territory.

As the Paris climate talks approach, the demise of the Keystone XL pipeline project and, possibly, other oil and gas projects is good news for those on the front lines. But in tiny areas of North America, First Nations clans find no relief.

YES! Magazine sent two reporters 800 miles deep into the Pacific Northwest wilderness to visit the Unist'ot'en clan, who are standing in the path of three oil and gas pipelines headed to coastal waters and on to distant Asian markets.

Stephen Miller and Tony Manno returned from their journey with a story to tell the rest of the world about the unique struggles of this clan, in words, photos, and videos. They also came back utterly changed after the experience of being "the outsiders"—white, male, and privileged—in a First Nation world still struggling against colonialism. Experience their journey in this new immersive special report.

 

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