Most Recent from YES! Magazine

When the Grandmothers Awoke
by Jennifer Browdy
Becoming a global family, one that unites ancient indigenous wisdom with other faith and cultural traditions, is essential if humanity is to overcome the crises of climate change.
From Warrior Cops to Community Police: A Former Chief on How We Can Turn Back the Tide of Militarization
by Norm Stamper
Police in America belong to the people—not the other way around. Former Seattle police Chief Norm Stamper on how we can turn war zone occupiers back into friendly neighborhood officers.
Forget Dystopian Fiction: This New Novel Explores Being a Modern Teenager Waiting for the End Times
by Christopher Zumski Finke
In Bryan Bliss' debut novel, 16-year-old Abigail's family follows a charismatic preacher to San Francisco, where they live in a van to wait out the apocalypse. But if you believe completely that the world is coming to an end, what do you do when it doesn’t?
Women Over 65 Own Nearly a Third of Iowa’s Farmland—Can They Prevent the Next Dust Bowl?
by Sena Christian
So many older women are inheriting farms that some experts believe training them in land conservation may be society's best bet in protecting the food supply.
We're Young, Passionate, and Bent on Justice: Why #BlackLivesMatter Is Irresistible
by Adrienne Maree Brown
The people dying are moms and dads, kids and teenagers, nerdy, quiet boys and girls. This movement is showing what wholeness looks like and demanding an uncompromised justice.
These Neighbors Got Together to Buy Vacant Buildings. Now They’re Renting to Bakers and Brewers
by Olivia LaVecchia
Though the model is new and small, it holds outsize potential for the many neighborhoods whose downtowns are controlled by faraway landlords or retail chains.
These Cities Built Cheap, Fast, Community-Owned Broadband. Here's What Net Neutrality Means For Them
by Gar Alperovitz, Thomas M. Hanna
Publicly owned broadband lets local communities from Iowa to Louisiana control a vital economic resource—rather than leaving it in the hands of a few monopolistic corporations. The outcome of this week's FCC vote could either help or hinder the path forward.
Students for Economic Pluralism, Unite! How College Kids Are Taking on the “High Priests” of Money
by James Trimarco
After years of work as a climate activist, Keith Harrington decided to get a degree in economics. Now, he’s working to transform the field.
Replace the Gospel of Money: An Interview With David Korten
by Dean Paton
What if we measured wealth in terms of life, and how well we serve it?
The Largest Chinese Bike Share Program Is 12 Times the Size of NYC’s
by Miles Schneiderman, Peter D'Auria
(And 22 other numbers that will help you understand our world).
“We've Known What Police Brutality Feels Like”: Pussy Riot’s Tribute Song to Eric Garner
by Christopher Zumski Finke
In a new music video, two members from Russian punk band Pussy Riot get dirt shoveled over their faces and are buried alive. It's powerful and disturbing to watch.
Local Food With a Big Twist: Oregon Super-Cooperative Takes Aim at the Corporate Food System
by Mary Hansen, Liz Pleasant
This co-op south of Portland wants to strengthen the local food system by helping local farmers cooperate instead of compete with one another.
Why We Need a New—and Old—Relationship With Our Living Earth
by Dean Paton
More and more people have come to understand that behaving as if they hold all rights to Earth’s bounty amounts to an eighth deadly sin.
Is the Maker Movement About Hacking Society—Or Just Hardware?
by Kayla Schultz
At feminist hackerspaces, members are less interested in digital trespassing than in developing a safe community for experimenting, creating, and collaborating.
Bigger Than Science, Bigger Than Religion
by Richard Schiffman
We’re closer to environmental disaster than ever before. We need a new story for our relationship with the Earth, one that goes beyond science and religion.