Most Recent from YES! Magazine

The Team Helping Human-Trafficking Survivors Find Justice—And Jobs
by Daniel Ross
The Thai Community Development Center has played a part in some of the most notorious human-trafficking cases in the United States. But unlike other groups, it also helps workers post-liberation.
7 Things the Defund DAPL Campaign Has Achieved So Far (Including $28 Million in Personal Accounts Moved)
by Ari Paul
Public and consumer pressure on banks to quit financing the Dakota Access pipeline companies is producing results.
Arctic Waters Have Been Rescued From Drilling, But What About the Land?
by Brennan Lagasse
Time is running out for Obama to say no to Big Oil and permanently protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge—and the people who depend on it.
Why I Kneeled Before Standing Rock Elders and Asked For Forgiveness
by Sarah van Gelder
“We fought you. We took your land. We signed treaties that we broke … But we’ve come to say that we are sorry.”
How to Face a Trump Presidency: Resist, Reconnect, Renew
by Sarah van Gelder
We can’t count on Republicans or Democrats to save us. Instead, we are the ones to build the world we want, starting in our communities.
The Fix-It Shop Where Neighbors Repair Your Clothes and Electronics
by Araz Hachadourian
Three years ago, they started a program to keep salvageable goods from landfills by harnessing the community’s collective skills to fix them.
Wisconsin Tribe Halts $1.5 Billion Open-Pit Mine
by Jaime Alfaro
To protect vital wetlands, the Ojibwe tribe and local scientists and activists pressured industry to abandon plans for what would have harmed thousands of species of plants and animals.
Some “Unrecognized” Tribes Still Waiting After 130 Years
by Gabriel Furshong
Federal recognition offers financial help, and those tribes without it have “second-class status in Indian Country” and remain vulnerable to local authorities.
6 Solutions That Support Native Sovereignty—From Tribal Schooling to Bison Herds
by Araz Hachadourian, Christa Hillstrom
Florida’s Miccosukee is the first tribe allowed to run its own school, where students fully participate in family and cultural activities.
Thanks, Trump! We Now Have Two Opportunities for Bold Progressive Reform
by Arun Gupta
There’s an argument to be made that progressives are lucky Bernie Sanders didn’t win the nomination.
How Standing Rock’s Divest Campaign Can Stop Future Pipelines
by Colby Devitt
As banks begin to respond, environmental movements are learning the importance of speaking clearly about the financial risks of fossil fuel investment.
At Standing Rock, No One Goes Hungry: The Kitchen That Serves Traditional Lakota Food and Values
by Michael Running Wolf
The landscape of these indigenous-led kitchens that feed thousands of water protectors is dynamic, much like the ad hoc camps that depend upon them.
Seattle Takes Steps to Divest $3 Billion From Wells Fargo Over Standing Rock
by Ari Paul
The proposal will be voted on next month and could have broader implications to ensure the city partners with socially responsible businesses.
In One of the Nation’s Unhealthiest Places, This Hospital Prescribes Fresh Food From Its Own Farm
by Liza Bayless
In an industry usually focused on medicine and procedures, a Philadelphia-area hospital decided what its patients needed was a farm and advice about food.
North Dakota’s Public Bank Was Built for the People—Now It’s Financing Police at Standing Rock
by Matt Stannard
The nation’s only state bank was created to empower small farmers and local economies, but now it’s being used to silence indigenous people with militarized force. How did this happen?