Most Recent from YES! Magazine

Do Corporations Really Need More Rights? Why Fast Track for the TPP Is a Bad Idea
by David Korten
We can have democracy and a prosperous, just, and sustainable human future. Or we can have corporate rule. We cannot have both.
Can the Left and Right Unite to End Corporate Rule? An Interview with Ralph Nader and Daniel McCarthy
by Sarah van Gelder
Partisan gridlock keeps the focus on the fight—but we might have some radical ideas in common.
Craigslist Saved 5M Tons of Stuff From Landfills—And 4 Other New Stats on Local Economies
by Mary Hansen
Exactly how much difference do “new economy” organizations make? Economists looked into it, and here are a few of their results.
What’s the True Impact of the Alternative Economy? Researchers Decide It’s Time to Find Out
by Eban Goodstein, Robin Hahnel
Successful initiatives are investing in human relationships, not faceless call centers or centralized headquarters.
“The Internet Is My Lifeline”: Hip-Hop Artist Jasiri X on the FCC’s Net Neutrality Vote
by Kayla Schultz
The political artist from Pittsburgh speaks about the importance of the Internet and social media in making the voices of low-income people of color heard.
When the Grandmothers Awoke
by Jennifer Browdy
Becoming a global family, one that unites ancient indigenous wisdom with other faith and cultural traditions, is essential if humanity is to overcome the crises of climate change.
"Letting Go of Worry" Middle School Winner Leah Berkowitz
by Leah Berkowitz
Leah Berkowitz is a student at West Valley City School in Spokane, Washington. She read and responded to the YES! Magazine online article "Life After Worry" by Akaya Windwood. Read Leah's essay about replacing worry with bravery.
"Letting Go of Worry" High School Winner Rechanne Waddell
by Rechanne Waddell
Rechanne Waddell is a student at Cypress Springs High School in Cypress, Texas. She read and responded to the YES! Magazine online article "Life After Worry" by Akaya Windwood. Read Rechanne's essay about the impact that worry has on her and her family.
"Letting Go of Worry" University Winner Noah Schultz
by Noah Schultz
Noah Schultz is studying for a double major in human development and sustainability through Oregon State University's online program. He read and responded to the YES! Magazine online article "Life After Worry" by Akaya Windwood. Read Noah's essay about the role that worry has in his relationship with his father.
"Letting Go of Worry" Powerful Voice Winner Melanie Fox
by Melanie Fox
Melanie Fox is a student at Orchard View Charter School in Sebastopol, California. She read and responded to the YES! Magazine online article "Life After Worry" by Akaya Windwood. Read Melanie's essay about how a person's worries can define them, for better or for worse.
"Letting Go of Worry" Powerful Voice Winner Carolina Mendez
by Carolina Mendez
Carolina Mendez is a student at Foundations Venture Academy in Stockton, California. She read and responded to the YES! Magazine online article "Life After Worry" by Akaya Windwood. Read Carolina's essay about how letting go of worry helped her deal with the effects of Vitiligo, an autoimmune disease affecting skin pigmentation.
Akaya Windwood's Response to "Letting Go of Worry" Essay Winners
by Akaya Windwood
Akaya Windwood responds to the winners of the Winter 2015 "Letting Go of Worry" essay competition.
"Letting Go of Worry" Powerful Voice Winner Margaret O'Neil
by Margaret O'Neil
Margaret O'Neil is a student at Casey Middle School in Boulder, Colorado. She read and responded to the YES! Magazine online article "Life After Worry" by Akaya Windwood. Read Margaret's essay about replacing her worry with gratitude.
"Letting Go of Worry" Literary Gems
by Jing Fong
We received many powerful essays for the Winter 2015 Writing Competition. Though not every participant can win the contest, we'd like to share some excerpts that caught our eye.
Forget Dystopian Fiction: This New Novel Explores Being a Modern Teenager Waiting for the End Times
by Christopher Zumski Finke
In Bryan Bliss' debut novel, 16-year-old Abigail's family follows a charismatic preacher to San Francisco, where they live in a van to wait out the apocalypse. But if you believe completely that the world is coming to an end, what do you do when it doesn’t?