Most Recent from YES! Magazine

After Trauma at Standing Rock, Recovery and New Resolve
by Sarah van Gelder
Songs and prayers, words of encouragement, and spaces for recovery are at the core of the healing happening here at Standing Rock.
Key Sanders Supporter on Loving—and Criticizing—the Democratic Party
by Sarah van Gelder
Ohio state Sen. Nina Turner talks about being disinvited to introduce Bernie Sanders at the DNC, racism in America, and grassroots leadership.
Forget More Regulation: Make Corporations Serve the Public Interest
by David Korten
The purely private-purpose corporation is an illegitimate entity. This is the elephant in the room that no politician dare mention.
All This Anger and Mourning on the American Right
by Laura Saponara
Can liberals empathize with Trump supporters? How to understand people on the other side during this election cycle.
How to Contact the People Sending Militarized Police to Standing Rock
by Emily Fuller
Have a question about the militarization of policing near Dakota Access pipeline construction? Here’s who to call, starting with Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier.
Why Police From 7 Different States Invaded a Standing Rock Camp—and Other Questions
by Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn
To clear the way for a pipeline, North Dakota invoked a measure reserved for state emergencies like natural disasters. That’s one answer.
First Statewide Carbon Tax Is What Our Climate Moment Demands
by Richard H. Gammon
Climate scientists like me need to be clear about the global danger. Putting a price on CO2 would slow warming more effectively than any other policy tool we have available.
Remember This When You Talk About Standing Rock
by Kelly Hayes
Yes, everyone should be talking about climate change. But we deserve to survive because our lives are worth defending in their own right — not simply because “this affects us all.”
10 Nasty Women Who Shaped American History
by Kate Schatz
Before Trump ever called Clinton a “nasty woman,” these fierce ladies were getting it done—in the face of B.S. from the boys.
Maryland Parolees Finally Won the Right to Vote—Now Will They?
by Lynsi Burton
Under a new law this year, 40,000 Maryland residents previously convicted of felonies can now vote. Advocates are helping them realize how powerful they can be.
I Saw the Revolution in So Many of the Small Places We Call Home
by Sarah van Gelder
The real change we need to stop the social and ecological unraveling can be found in the neighborhoods and cities, where we encounter each other every day.
The Injustice at Standing Rock Is an American Story
by Mark Trahant
I’m angry. White people in Oregon are acquitted while Native people in North Dakota are attacked by riot police from five states. And our politicians are preoccupied.
Why Exxon Loves the Carbon Tax—and Voters Should Not
by Wenonah Hauter
Washington state is considering putting a price on carbon emissions. This will not fix our climate problem and, in fact, will help fossil fuel companies continue to profit from it.
The Rush to Turn Anti-Trump Election Money Into Long-Term Progress
by Jaime Alfaro
Most political donations go to short-term strategies like TV ads. But these organizers move contributions to grassroots organizing that can have lasting impacts.
Who Deserves a Liberal Arts Degree? For Inmates, It’s a Way Out
by Liza Bayless
Obama's controversial pilot program will make higher education dollars available to inmates this year. Proponents hope it will build on the success private liberal arts programs are achieving in prisons across the country.