Most Recent from YES! Magazine

When the Grandmothers Awoke
by Jennifer Browdy
Becoming a global family, one that unites ancient indigenous wisdom with other faith and cultural traditions, is essential if humanity is to overcome the crises of climate change.
"Letting Go of Worry" Middle School Winner Leah Berkowitz
by Leah Berkowitz
Leah Berkowitz is a student at West Valley City School in Spokane, Washington. She read and responded to the YES! Magazine online article "Life After Worry" by Akaya Windwood. Read Leah's essay about replacing worry with bravery.
"Letting Go of Worry" High School Winner Rechanne Waddell
by Rechanne Waddell
Rechanne Waddell is a student at Cypress Springs High School in Cypress, Texas. She read and responded to the YES! Magazine online article "Life After Worry" by Akaya Windwood. Read Rechanne's essay about the impact that worry has on her and her family.
"Letting Go of Worry" University Winner Noah Schultz
by Noah Schultz
Noah Schultz is studying for a double major in human development and sustainability through Oregon State University's online program. He read and responded to the YES! Magazine online article "Life After Worry" by Akaya Windwood. Read Noah's essay about the role that worry has in his relationship with his father.
"Letting Go of Worry" Powerful Voice Winner Melanie Fox
by Melanie Fox
Melanie Fox is a student at Orchard View Charter School in Sebastopol, California. She read and responded to the YES! Magazine online article "Life After Worry" by Akaya Windwood. Read Melanie's essay about how a person's worries can define them, for better or for worse.
"Letting Go of Worry" Powerful Voice Winner Carolina Mendez
by Carolina Mendez
Carolina Mendez is a student at Foundations Venture Academy in Stockton, California. She read and responded to the YES! Magazine online article "Life After Worry" by Akaya Windwood. Read Carolina's essay about how letting go of worry helped her deal with the effects of Vitiligo, an autoimmune disease affecting skin pigmentation.
Akaya Windwood's Response to "Letting Go of Worry" Essay Winners
by Akaya Windwood
Akaya Windwood responds to the winners of the Winter 2015 "Letting Go of Worry" essay competition.
"Letting Go of Worry" Powerful Voice Winner Margaret O'Neil
by Margaret O'Neil
Margaret O'Neil is a student at Casey Middle School in Boulder, Colorado. She read and responded to the YES! Magazine online article "Life After Worry" by Akaya Windwood. Read Margaret's essay about replacing her worry with gratitude.
"Letting Go of Worry" Literary Gems
by Jing Fong
We received many powerful essays for the Winter 2015 Writing Competition. Though not every participant can win the contest, we'd like to share some excerpts that caught our eye.
Forget Dystopian Fiction: This New Novel Explores Being a Modern Teenager Waiting for the End Times
by Christopher Zumski Finke
In Bryan Bliss' debut novel, 16-year-old Abigail's family follows a charismatic preacher to San Francisco, where they live in a van to wait out the apocalypse. But if you believe completely that the world is coming to an end, what do you do when it doesn’t?
Women Over 65 Own Nearly a Third of Iowa’s Farmland—Can They Prevent the Next Dust Bowl?
by Sena Christian
So many older women are inheriting farms that some experts believe training them in land conservation may be society's best bet in protecting the food supply.
We're Young, Passionate, and Bent on Justice: Why #BlackLivesMatter Is Irresistible
by Adrienne Maree Brown
The people dying are moms and dads, kids and teenagers, nerdy, quiet boys and girls. This movement is showing what wholeness looks like and demanding an uncompromised justice.
These Neighbors Got Together to Buy Vacant Buildings. Now They’re Renting to Bakers and Brewers
by Olivia LaVecchia
Though the model is new and small, it holds outsize potential for the many neighborhoods whose downtowns are controlled by faraway landlords or retail chains.
These Cities Built Cheap, Fast, Community-Owned Broadband. Here's What Net Neutrality Means For Them
by Gar Alperovitz, Thomas M. Hanna
Publicly owned broadband lets local communities from Iowa to Louisiana control a vital economic resource—rather than leaving it in the hands of a few monopolistic corporations. The outcome of this week's FCC vote could either help or hinder the path forward.
Students for Economic Pluralism, Unite! How College Kids Are Taking on the “High Priests” of Money
by James Trimarco
After years of work as a climate activist, Keith Harrington decided to get a degree in economics. Now, he’s working to transform the field.