Most Recent from YES! Magazine

This Harry Potter Enthusiast Just Came Out as Trans on YouTube—And Thousands of People Are Watching‏
by Christopher Zumski Finke
Texas-born Jackson Bird waited 25 years to come out. Here's why he did it online.
What It’s Like to Be Gay at a Christian College—Where It’s a Reportable Offense
by Jenny Hudalla
At Minnesota’s Bethel University, homosexuality has long been considered a character flaw. But these days, students are not so sure.
Less than 1 Percent of Sweden’s Garbage Ends Up at the Dump
by Miles Schneiderman
How the country heats its homes, and another 23 facts about our world today.
His Ancestors Were Slave Traders and Hers Were Slaves. What They Learned About Healing from a Roadtrip
by Sharon Leslie Morgan, Thomas Norman DeWolf
We embarked upon a journey to test whether two people —could come to grips with deep, traumatic, historic wounds and find healing. We had no idea where we would end up.
Where Do “Rednecks” Really Come From? A New Museum Has the Surprising Answer
by Catherine V. Moore
Tourists spend $400 more per trip on average when their trips focus on history and culture. That could be a big opportunity for West Virginia's changing economy.
Bernie Sanders Just Introduced Legislation to Fund Free Undergrad Ed With Wall Street Transaction Taxes‏
by Deirdre Fulton
The "Robin Hood" tax on stock transactions would make education at public four-year colleges free.
These Friends from High School Bought an Abandoned Factory. Now They're Distilling Artisanal Whiskeys‏
by Samuel Dolgin-Gardner
Much as blight can be contagious, so can renewal. How grassroots community groups are saving neighborhoods and building new businesses.
These Minnesotans Boosted Walking in Their Small Town by 70 Percent. Here's How.
by Jay Walljasper
In Albert Lea, Minnesota, residents rejuvenated their rural community through increased physical activity.
Chicago Just Became the First U.S. City to Pay Reparations to Victims of Police Torture
by Araz Hachadourian
For nearly 20 years, officers of the Chicago Police Department tortured more than 100 people. How survivors and their lawyers won a decades-long fight.
What If Your Hometown Became "America's Rape Capital"?
by Christopher Zumski Finke
Missoula has a problem—just like every college town in America. A sociologist weighs in on Jon Krakauer's new book about sexual assault at the University of Montana.
40 Acres and a Mule Would Be at Least $6.4 Trillion Today—What the U.S. Really Owes Black America
by Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn, Jeff Neumann
Slavery made America wealthy, and racist policies since have blocked African American wealth-building. Can we calculate the economic damage?
How Lynching Shaped American History—From the Old South to Modern Prisons
by Liz Pleasant
For Bryan Stevensen, the largest evil surrounding African-American history isn’t slavery, but the pervasiveness of white supremacy and the difficulty we have discussing it openly.
Even in a Drought, California Farms Have a Future—But They’ll Need Local Control to Succeed
by Keith Harrington
Some California farmers have discovered ways to farm that use very little water, yet thirstier methods still dominate. What gives?
Want the Best Solutions for California’s Epic Drought? Ask a Farmworker from the Central Valley
by Sarah Mirk
“Low-income disadvantaged communities are the best water conservationists: At the end of the day, we’re not going to waste water because it costs money.”
You’ve Heard What’s Wrong in Freddie Gray’s Neighborhood. Here’s One Local’s Vision for Turning That Around
by Mary Hansen
Blaize Connelly-Duggan’s vision for the neighborhood is all about community ownership and development without displacement.