Most Recent from YES! Magazine

"Hack Your Impact" Lesson Plan and Worksheet
by Simone Larson
How is our climate changing, and what kind of action (or inaction) is causing climate to change? This interdisciplinary lesson plan will allow students to measure their own carbon footprint, and encourage discussion of ways to lessen the damage we're doing to our earth.
51 Nations and 44 Languages: A Shared Struggle Toward Integration and Acceptance
by Luis Escamilla
In 2010, former Los Angeles Superior Court law clerk Luis Escamilla traded the courtroom for the classroom, where he teaches his immigrant and refugee students English, history, and a worldly understanding of identity and justice. This is Luis’ story.
The Science Behind Why Good Things Really Do Happen to People Who Wait
by Kira M. Newman
Religions and philosophers have long praised the virtue of patience; now researchers are starting to do so as well.
The Future of Libraries Is Bigger Than Books
by Cat Johnson
Modern libraries are essential in underserved communities as places where everyone is welcome to gather, work, borrow materials, or just spend time.
How to Talk With Your Kids about Donald Trump
by Allison Briscoe-Smith
The success of Trump’s candidacy isn’t just a political problem. It’s also a psychological and cultural one that needs to be addressed by parents.
What’s It Like to Be the New Kid and a Refugee?
by Jaclyn Zubrzycki
Small town and suburban public schools become welcome centers as more immigrants are moving outside major metropolitan areas.
Politics on the Dance Floor: Reclaiming Queer and Black Roots in Electronic Dance Music
by Keith Barbalato
As the multibillion-dollar electronic music industry grows, artists and organizers are taking back the spaces and sounds of the marginalized people who started the genre.
Video: This New York Farm Wants to Fix the “Food Apartheid”
by Jasleena Grewal
Soul Fire Farm provides farm education to Black and Latino youth in an effort to end a history of racism and injustice in America's food system.
You Know What’s Really Gross? Not Periods, But Taxes on Periods
by Lynsi Burton
Class action lawsuits point out the irrationality of sales-tax exemptions for items such as Rogaine, foot powder, and Viagra—but not menstrual products.
Finally, the U.S. Steps Closer to Racial Healing With a National Truth and Reconciliation Commission
by Yessenia Funes
South Africa used truth and reconciliation to address its racist history. Now these organizers think it's time for the United States to do the same.
What I Learned From My March With Democracy Spring
by Frances Moore Lappé
The political march is a tool for social transformation in itself. This one gave me a taste of the connected, empowered society I’m working to create.
How to Educate a Generation of Syrian Refugees? Makeshift Classrooms and the Teacher Next Door
by Samantha Schmidt
In response to overcrowded public schools in countries neighboring Syria, caravan schools provide refugees with free education to keep them from falling behind.
No Fossil Fuel? No Problem—7 Ways We're Already Living More Locally
by YES! Staff
From affordable transit to local food for school lunches, many people across America are already on their way to living a life without oil.
In a Surprise Win for Democracy Over Corporate Power, GMO Labeling Has Arrived
by Andrew Kimbrell
Those predicting an easy Senate defeat for mandatory labeling saw corporations fold one by one in the face of a strong food movement.
Could Sanders’ Social Justice Ideas Really Work? Take a Look at These Places
by Fran Korten
In his new film, “Where to Invade Next,” Michael Moore shows us what free college and health care for all can actually look like.