Most Recent from YES! Magazine

“You Fly to the Edge of the Tar Sands, and ... No Life”: A Montana Professor on the Issue of Our Time
by Sarah van Gelder
University of Montana professor George Price on permaculture, race, and how he’s standing up to tar sands extraction.
Drugs, Sex, and Debt: It’s Time to Revamp “The Talk”
by Dina Gachman
Let’s remove the shame from the conversation and help the next generation avoid the debilitating amounts of debt that keep us from buying houses or taking vacations.
Dear Donald Trump: Pissed Off Latinos Are Powerful Latinos
by Yessenia Funes
History has shown that when Latinos feel threatened, they fight back—with their voices and voting power.
Sci-Fi Fandom Declares Victory After Reactionary Nominees Lose Big at the Hugos
by Miles Schneiderman
Despite a deck stacked against women and people of color, the voters rewarded both.
How Craft Beer Brewers Brought Bottle Recycling to Montana
by A.C. Shilton
Glass is a pain in Montana’s, uh, recycling program. But the craft brew industry is on the case.
This Artist Collects Your Worst Fears and Turns Them Into Something Great
by Alexa Strabuk
The Fear Project uses art to visually interpret the parts of life that scare us the most, normalizing fear as a part of ourselves.
How Seattle Made Dark Alleys Safer—By Throwing Parties In Them
by Araz Hachadourian
Since nearly a third of the city's walkable spaces are filled with cars, these residents decided to take back the alleys.
The Crunch: The Hackers Behind DIY Gynecology (And Other News to Chew On)
by YES! Staff
A Mexican artist turns guns into a force for good, Banksy turns Disneyland into something dismal, and GynePunks bring open-source gynecology to the masses.
6 Strategies to Make Powerful Social Change—Starting With “Stay Woke”
by Mistinguette Smith
Bree Newsome’s removal of the Confederate flag from the South Carolina Statehouse reminds us that real change comes from people power.
How One San Francisco Neighborhood Became “Immune” to Gentrification
by Rick Jacobus
With more than a quarter of the Tenderloin’s housing stock owned by nonprofits or the government, longtime residents have staying power.
Own a Home in Just Four Years? This Co-Op Program Keeps Workers in the Neighborhood
by Yessenia Funes
Nearly half of Evergreen’s worker-owners have purchased homes through the program.
Why We Did an Issue on Debt
by James Trimarco, Christa Hillstrom
Good debts? We know it sounds crazy. But there’s a quiet revolution brewing in how we move money around, and we want our readers to know about it.
At the World's First Empathy Museum, Visitors Walk a Mile in Another Person’s Shoes—Literally
by Roman Krznaric
Founders of the first ever empathy museum are calling for a revolution of human relationships. Here's how you can help.
Video: 10 Years After Katrina, Has New Orleans Recovered?
by Laura Flanders
This new documentary looks at gentrification in New Orleans and its effects on the city's low-income communities.
I Learned More by Leading a Student-Debt Strike Than I Did at College
by Nathan Hornes
After graduating from Everest College with a bad education and no job prospects in sight, I refused to pay my student loans. Now I’m helping lead the first student-debt strike in America.