Most Recent from YES! Magazine

What Small Farms Need to Compete With Corporate Food
by Kate Stringer
Most small farms have to follow the same rules as big corporate ones. In Maine, flexible food ordinances have increased the number of small farmers.
The Pragmatic Impacts of Sanders’ Big Dreams
by Sarah van Gelder
Even with Tuesday’s campaign setbacks, Bernie Sanders’ pledge to make the country more equitable and sustainable is more realistic than some people are letting on.
How a Worker-Owned Tech Startup Found Investors—and Kept Its Values
by Nathan Schneider
As cooperative culture spreads into the tech world, Loomio is part of a new wave of entrepreneurs figuring out how to finance a more democratic, values-centered online economy.
Humanizing Heroin Addiction: Photos of the Real Lives of Users
by Aaron Goodman
Can more balanced representations of drug users spark discussions on how to solve North America’s heroin epidemic?
Retrofitting Suburbia: Communities Innovate Their Way Out of Sprawl
by Erin Sagen
The future for suburbanites, who now have twice the carbon footprint of city dwellers, seems to be pointing backward to pre-automobile, train-based living.
Happiness Inequality Is a Better Measure of Well-Being Than Income Inequality
by Kira M. Newman
Researchers say happiness reveals more about human welfare than standard indicators like wealth, education, health, or good government.
A Sanders-Clinton Combined Strategy Could Boost Native Americans’ Quality of Life
by Jennifer Biess
To meet multifaceted needs in Indian Country, Sanders and Clinton should combine their economic proposals.
National Parks Are Used Mostly By Older White People. Here’s Why That Needs to Change
by Lornet ­­­­­­­­­­­­Turnbull
With its history of segregation, the Park Service has had a rocky relationship with race. But if youth of color don’t connect with the outdoors, who will be its future stewards?
Salmon—It’s What’s For Dinner (Even If You’re a Tree)
by Jennifer Luxton, Stephen Miller
Each year, immense schools of migrating salmon bring nutrients from the ocean to Pacific Northwest rivers—literally feeding the trees. Here’s where humans come in.
In Photos: The Indigenous Protectors of the World’s Most Sacred Places
by Christopher McLeod
All around the world, sites sacred to indigenous people are besieged by mining, tourism, and other threats. Meet the groups safeguarding and restoring them.
This Earth Day, Listen Up: Mother Earth Is Calling Us Back
by David Korten
Those of us who succumbed to the false promises of Western consumerism at great cost to the planet and to ourselves are Earth’s prodigal children now returning home.
Want to Hire a Worker-Owned Co-op? There’s an App for That
by Michelle Stearn
Coopify wants to bring a sense of community to the app-based booking world by connecting worker-owned cooperatives and other low-income task workers directly with consumers.
The Seed-Saving Farmers Securing the Future of Food
by Erin Sagen
The problems of—and the solutions for—our industrialized food system start at the most basic level: the seed.
Time to Grow Up Into a Living Earth Economy
by David Korten
Humanity has been acting like a willful child, demanding everything and leaving messes everywhere. It is time for our species to take the step to maturity, to acknowledge that care and cooperation are key to happiness—and even survival.
How a Health Clinic Made a Local Grocery Store Part of Its Prescription
by Bob Van Meter
A partnership between a Boston health clinic and a local grocery shows what economic development can do when it makes community health a priority.