Most Recent from YES! Magazine

Brooklyn Youth Create Jobs (and Community Roots) Through Local Compost Program
by Rebecca Nathanson
This neighborhood made gardens out of vacant lots to tackle gentrification and high youth unemployment.
Cancel Black History Month? Watch Kids Respond to Fox News’ Latest
by YES! Staff
Here’s what happened when a group of kids heard what Stacey Dash said about Black History Month.
The Middle Eastern TV Show Bringing Feminist Views on Marriage to 80 Million People
by Lindsey Weedston
In Turkey, a soap opera is informing women of their rights and challenging cultural assumptions about marriage.
Spring 2016 Student Writing Competition: What We Fear
Want a motivator to take your students' writing to a higher level? Here's an opportunity to write for a real audience, and the chance to get published by an award-winning magazine.
The Pipeline Strikes Back: The Audacity of TransCanada's $15B Suit Against the U.S.
by Jim Shultz
The political saga of the Keystone XL pipeline is like a real-life version of The Force Awakens. So why are we giving the Dark Side even more power?
Flint Whistleblowers Who Exposed Their Poisoned Water: We’re Just Getting Started
by Larry Gabriel
Long before the state declared an emergency in Flint, Michigan, a pastor, a mother, and an attorney teamed up to reveal the state’s lies about their drinking water.
The Oil Industry Won in Alberta. Now First Nations Look to Heal Their Land
by Erika Lundahl
The Alberta tar sands are home to the third-largest proven reserves of crude oil in the world. Here, First Nations engage in a complex dance of resistance to and cooperation with industry in order to survive.
Infographic: Why We Need New Farmers
In 2012, 62 percent of farmers were older than 55, while only 6 percent were younger than 35. As generations age out of farming, who will replace them? This infographic encourages students to think about the future of local food production and what it means to be a new farmer today.
Visual Learning: Don't Jump the Gun
This visual learning exercise will get your students thinking about how gun violence affects their communities, and ways to build safe and healthy spaces for young people to thrive.
If There Are No New Farmers, Who Will Grow Our Food?
by Kim Eckart
Programs across the country are trying to make it easier for new farmers to get started and put down roots. Here's why: There's only one farmer under 35 for every six over 65. By 2030, one-quarter of America's current farmers will retire.
Infographic: Gender Identity and Expression
Are you confused about how to refer to someone? He, she, or they? Gender is a complicated social construct that goes beyond the binary definition of man and woman. Help your students better understand themselves and their peers with IMPACT’s easy-to-use interactive map that explains over 40 definitions of gender.
Refugee Stories: Mapping a Crisis
The current refugee migration out of the Middle East is a pressing human rights concern. This lesson from Brown University’s Choices Program places students in a refugee’s shoes to help them understand why people flee their homes, and their arduous journey to find a safe place to live.
White Privilege II Showed Me What an Unruly Mess We’re In
by Jonathan Cunningham
A Seattle music writer quoted in Macklemore’s controversial new song appreciates how it speaks to young white people—but wishes it had gone further.
This Youth Advocate and Father Empowers Young Men to Define and Build Healthy Relationships
by Marcus Griggs
Marcus Griggs’ father grew up in a violent home, but the cycle of abuse stopped when he had his own children. Through example and discipline, Marcus was taught how to be a strong and loving man. Today, Marcus helps young men who have experienced violence or abuse develop the skills to have healthy relationships—and become the best young men they can be. This is Marcus’ story.
As Rising Seas Force Exile, Islanders Hold Fast to What Matters Most
by Keith Barbalato
Pacific Islanders are among the first victims of climate change-induced sea level rise. As natives quickly run out of land and struggle to maintain crops, leaders are searching for ways to protect their people and thousands of years of cultural heritage.