Most Recent from YES! Magazine

After Years of Living as Squatters, These Filipino Neighbors Fought for Nice, New Homes in Their Community—And Won
by Aurora Almendral
When the Manila government proposed relocating squatter families out of the city, residents came together and asked for housing in their own neighborhood.
Job Opening: YES! Reporting Fellow
This position is ideal for journalists from underrepresented communities who are somewhat obsessed with things like worker-owned cooperatives, community banking, and land trusts—and how clever people are using them to build a world that works for everybody
One in Four Local Banks Has Vanished Since 2008. Why We Should Treat It as a National Crisis
by Stacy Mitchell
While megabanks make megabucks, local banks are financing businesses that create jobs and improve well-being. So why are they disappearing so rapidly?
Tiny Houses in Paradise! 20 Incredible Vacation Rentals on Airbnb
by Cat Johnson
From caves in Spain to treehouses in Cape Town, check out Airbnb's best tiny house destinations.
Young Guatemalan Farmers Fight For Land Rights, Local Food, and Sustainable Traditions Endangered by Global Trade Deals‏
by Jeff Abbott
The same forces that have driven many onto the migrant trail have led to the emergence of a movement of young campesinos organizing to stay on their land.
Call for Submissions: Our Minds, Bodies, and Well-Being
From healing personal trauma to building safe and sustainable communities, we're going to explore what health means today. Send us your pitches by May 20!
Baltimoreans Celebrate Charging of Officers—But Say It’s Just First Step
by Mary Hansen, Araz Hachadourian
“It’s not ‘game over,’ it’s ‘game on.’ Now, we can actually start to see things happening.”
Meet the Woman Behind #BlackLivesMatter—The Hashtag That Became a Civil Rights Movement
by Liz Pleasant
Alicia Garza and two friends first tweeted #BlackLivesMatter to spark a conversation after the death of Trayvon Martin. Three years later, their hashtag has become a movement.
After Baltimore: It’s Time to Make Things Right‏
by Sarah van Gelder
From slavery to police brutality, reconciliation begins with the truth‏.
5 Numbers to Help You Understand Life in Freddie Gray's Baltimore
by Jennifer Luxton, Araz Hachadourian
The #BaltimoreUprising isn't just about one death. Years of systemic neglect have left people with shorter lives, poor educations, and few employment opportunities.
Photos: Baltimore Protests Inspire Renewed Sense of Direction For Community Leaders‏
by Cecilia Garza, Mary Hansen
“If people are calling for peace, we need to push the narrative toward policies and political changes that are actually going to give people the conditions to deal with structural violence.”
One of These 4 Radical, Badass Women Could Be on the $20 Bill
by Lindsey Weedston
Until May 10, Americans will vote on Rosa Parks, Harriet Tubman, and two other contenders to replace Andrew Jackson.
Is the Local Economy Too Local? Why Co-Ops and Credit Unions Need a Broader Strategy
by Keith Harrington
Author and activist Gar Alperovitz calls it a “checkerboard strategy.” In the first piece in a series, we look at the organizations working to transform our economy, and how they can benefit from working together.
State of Emergency—Meet the Everyday People Demanding Justice on Baltimore Streets
by Liz Pleasant
Video: City council members, religious leaders, and community activists continue to ask Baltimore police be held accountable for Freddie Gray's death.
"Freddie Gray Used to Buy Me Ice Cream"—Voices From the Streets of Baltimore
by Liz Pleasant
After 25-year-old Freddie Gray died from injuries sustained in a Baltimore police van, city residents are rallying to demand accountability.