Most Recent from YES! Magazine

Signs of Life :: Health Care
by Noah Grant
Support Grows for National Plan
Signs of Life :: Corporations
by Margit Christenson, Madeline Ostrander
Towns Rein in Corporate Power; Exxon Faces Court Challenges
Signs of Life :: Human Rights
by Brooke Jarvis
Chile Recognizes Indigenous Rights
Signs of Life :: Elections
by Noah Grant
States Back the Popular Vote
Signs of Life :: Iraq War
by Madeline Ostrander
Virtual Memorials for War Casualties
Signs of Life :: Green Economy
by Jeremy Brecher, Tim Costello, Brendan Smith
Green Jobs Kindle Economic Hopes
Signs of Life :: Small Stories About Big Change
Masthead
The YES! Staff, Interns and Volunteers that helped put together the Summer 2008 issue of YES! Magazine: "A Just Foreign Policy."
Readers' Forum
Readers' letters from the Summer 2008 issue of YES! Magazine: 'Superpower? Get Over It.' Topics include Diet for a Warming Planet, Climate Change and Stuff, Let’s Talk Overpopulation, A Climate Mobilization, They Love Erica, Too, Your Backyard Footprint, Simplistic on Bolivia.
A Just Foreign Policy :: Cover Photo
by Chris Philippides
Has Your Town Declared Peace Yet?
by Ben Manski, Karen Dolan
Ben Manski and Karen Dolan show how local communities have quit waiting for the federal government and are making their own foreign policy
Aidan Delgado, Conscientious Objector
The Sutras of Abu Ghraib is the story of Aidan Delgado’s journey towards conscientious objector status. This excerpt is a meditation on how easy it is to distance ourselves from the devastation of war-making.
Life, Liberty, Water
by Maude Barlow
As climate change and worldwide shortages loom, will people fight over water or join together to protect it? A global water justice movement is demanding a change in international law to ensure the universal right to clean water for all.
Reclaiming Corn and Culture
by Wendy Call
NAFTA was sold as a win-win. After 14 years of losing, Mexican farmers are making their own trade rules—fair ones.
Raiding the War Chest
by Miriam Pemberton
It’s called “defense” spending, but how much of it is actually about defense? Here’s how we could save billions, and still have billions left to make the U.S. and the world more secure.