Most Recent from YES! Magazine

Without Fossil Fuels, a New Population Puzzle
by Laurie Mazur
So how many people can the planet really support?
10 Black Women Innovators and the Awesome Things They Brought Us
by Lindsey Weedston
From a better hairbrush to modern 3D technology, ten things that might never have existed without the invention or innovation of black women.
How Can Public Schools Stop Amplifying Inequality?
by Bill Bigelow
Low-income communities continue to look for the best ways to improve their schools as the income gap grows across America.
Massachusetts Clinic Treats Refugees With Mindfulness and Medicine From Home
by Heidi Shin
After doctors realized their exam room reminded traumatized patients of torture chambers, they invited Buddhist monks and Cambodian healers to bring age-old therapies to the clinic.
Austin’s Unique Policy Shift to Create Jobs for Everyone, Not Just Techies
by Amy Evans
How the city is promoting local economic growth that goes beyond deals for big companies.
More Confessions of an Economic Hit Man: This Time, They’re Coming for Your Democracy
by Sarah van Gelder
Twelve years ago, John Perkins published his book, “Confessions of an Economic Hit Man.” Today, he says “things have just gotten so much worse.”
Poor Families and Blue-Collar Heroes: “The Confirmation” is Keeping Hollywood Real
by Christopher Zumski Finke
“Nebraska” writer Bob Nelson on his new film and how economically depressed father and son characters are pulled from his own life story.
Frances Moore Lappé: Why I’m Facing Arrest to Get Money Out of Politics
by James Trimarco
On April 11, thousands of marchers with Democracy Spring will arrive in the nation’s capital. It’s expected to be the largest civil disobedience action in decades.
Unsung Black Heroines Launched a Modern Domestic Workers Movement—Powered By Their Own Stories
by Premilla Nadasen
The struggle for labor rights started decades ago among private household workers, mostly African-American women, whose stories inspired a powerful nationwide movement for dignity.
You Don’t Need a Science Degree to End World Hunger
by Raj Patel
Scientists aren’t the only ones who can solve problems like malnutrition—in fact, people who face hunger might be better at solving it.
20 Years in the Making, Great Bear Agreement Protects World’s Largest Temperate Rainforest
by Valerie Schloredt
The landmark deal between 27 First Nations, environmentalists, forest industry, and government preserves 85 percent of old-growth in one of the world’s great forests.
Malala Fund Team's Response to "Every Girl's Right" Essay Winners
The Malala Fund Team responds to the winners of the Winter 2016 "Every Girl's Right" writing competition.
"Every Girl's Right" Middle School Winner Dakota Cline
by Dakota Cline
Dakota Cline is a middle school student at Horizons K-8 in Boulder, CO. He read and responded to the online YES! Magazine article, "Standing With Malala: Meet the Teenagers Who Survived the Taliban and Kept Going to School," an interview with Shazia Ramzan and Kainat Riaz, the two friends of Malala who were also shot on the bus by the Taliban in 2012. Read Dakota's essay, "To Say 'Nah'," about the one thing he, Malala, and Rosa Parks all share: the drive to rebel.
"Every Girl's Right" Literary Gems
We received many outstanding essays for the Winter 2016 Writing Competition. Though not every participant can win the contest, we'd like to share some excerpts that caught our eye.
When Communities Decide They’ve Had Enough Violence
by Rev. John Dear
The new Nonviolent Cities project asks us to go beyond calls to end violence and instead create a pervasive culture of nonviolence.