5 Numbers to Help You Understand Life in Freddie Gray's Baltimore

The #BaltimoreUprising isn't just about one death. Years of systemic neglect have left people with shorter lives, poor educations, and few employment opportunities.
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On April 12, Baltimore police arrested Freddie Gray. His hands were cuffed, his legs were shackled, and he was placed into the back of a police van with no safety restraint or seat belt. When Gray arrived at a nearby city jail his spine was broken. He died from his injuries a week later.

Design by Jennifer Luxton. Photo by Fibonacci Blue / Flickr

Since Gray's death thousands of people in Baltimore have filled the streets in protest. Maryland's governor declared a state of emergency, issued a city-wide curfew, and called in the National Guard. Meanwhile, the #BaltimoreUprising movement has dominated Twitter feeds, front pages, and evening news reports.

Design by Jennifer Luxton. Photo by Bob Simpson / Flickr.

Activists point out that this movement is about much more than any single incident. Sandtown-Winchester, Gray's neighborhood on the west side of Baltimore, is a community whose residents live with police violence and institutional racism every day.

Design by Jennifer Luxton. Photo by Dorret / Flickr.

Yes, the suspicious circumstances surrounding Gray's death triggered these protests. But, the people of #BaltimoreUprising want more than just the police officers involved be held accountable for Gray's death. They are demanding a change to the system that caused it.

Design by Jennifer Luxton. Photo by Arash Azizzada / Flickr.